With more help, can Wright again hit .300, 30, 100?

In 2007, the Mets had the fourth-most productive offense in the National League, which included Jose Reyes and a lineup with three players that hit more than 20 HR and 80 RBI, including David Wright, who hit .325 with 30 HR and 107 RBI.

In 2008, the Mets had the second-most productive offense in the National League, which again included Reyes and a lineup with three players that hit more than 20 HR and 80 RBI, including Wright, who .303 with 33 HR and 115 RBI.

However, since then, the Mets have repeatedly been one of the worst and least consistent offenses in baseball, during which Wright has struggled to match the level of production he did in previous seasons.

Matthew Cerrone, Lead Writer

In other words, while there are some fans who feel Wright is the problem, there are others (like me) who believe – if surrounded with better hitters – he can return to being as productive as he was a few years ago. I know he isn’t getting any younger, but – in terms of power production, less average – historically speaking – these next few seasons should actually be his prime…

In a post to Mets Today, Joe Janish writes:

“I feel strongly that Wright will hit .300+ and 25+ HR in a lineup that includes other proven MLB run producers. You’re right, he’s not a Miguel Cabrera or Prince Fielder type of hitter, who can carry a club on his own. Though, even Fielder and Cabrera had each other in 2012, and Fielder had Ryan Braun previously, while Cabrera had Victor Martinez. As nice a player as Ike Davis is, he’s no Martinez, and certainly, no Braun. Most great hitters have at least one strong-hitting “sidekick” that helps them be great; Wright has had no such complementary teammate since Carlos Beltran‘s last full season as a Met in 2008 (when Wright last hit 30+ HRs, drove in 100+ RBI, and hit .300+). Off the top of my head, the only other really good NL hitters who didn’t have an established sidekick were Andrew McCutchen and Chase Headley. McCutchen is a bonafide superstar while Headley may have benefited from a combination of a second-half hot streak and the fact that people were not expecting him to be as good as he performed. In comparison, Wright finished with very good numbers — though he did, as you say, more or less disappear in the second half (similarly, Headley was only so-so in the first half).”

I totally agree with Joe. What’s more, according to Wins Above Replacement, Wright can be considered one of the best players in the National League.


So, the question is this…