Scott Boras doesn’t think the Mets misused Matt Harvey

Matt HarveyMatt Harvey‘s agent Scott Boras doesn’t believe the Mets acted improperly in regards to Matt Harvey and his elbow.

“With his age, and he’s a power pitcher and the whole thing, this is a very normal course for a major leaguer,” Boras said, according to ESPN New York. “It’s how you develop players. There’s nothing on that front that I think is an issue at all.”

Harvey had thrown 178 1/3 innings this season. Sandy Alderson said in June that Harvey would throw no more than 210 innings this season after throwing 169 1/3 innings in 2012.

Boras reiterated a need for patience with Harvey’s condition before everyone decides whether or not surgery is the proper course.

“When you’re talking about the term ‘partial tear,’ you’re talking about 5 percent to 95 percent,” Boras explained. “You have to get in and get the specifics and get more information medically before we can really make a determination as to what we’re dealing with.”

Harvey is 9-5 with a 2.27 ERA in 26 starts this season, having thrown 2,697 pitches in his 178 1/3 innings with a league-high 191 strikeouts.

Michael Baron, Contributor

It’s easy to point fingers and question what and the why over this injury. It really hurts, and it’s natural to want answers to satisfy the pain. But, in listening to Terry Collins and Sandy, and talking with others about player development and how teams handle young pitchers, I don’t see how the Mets screwed up the process. Sandy has said on several occasions they intended to limit Harvey’s innings count to no more than 215 innings (he’s currently at 178 with four weeks to go). They have been trying to manufacture ways to give both Harvey and Zack Wheeler extra days in between starts to limit their use, and throughout the player development process, they have followed their own standard protocol by increasing their innings limit by 30 or so innings from year-to-year (which is not unlike any other system in the game).

This could have happened anywhere at any time, potentially even before Harvey ever signed his first professional contract. Unfortunately, it happens and it sucks, especially when it happens to a team’s best pitcher with so much riding on him.


Read more: Rubin, ESPN New York




0 comments