Mets players are benefitting from Toradol injections

In a report for Newsday, David Lennon says several Mets players have taken Toradol injections to cope with pain and soreness in recent seasons.

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According to Lennon, “Toradol is an NSAID, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; it’s in the same class as over-the-counter medication like Advil, Aleve and Motrin. The difference is that Toradol is far more potent – it must be prescribed by a physician.”

Lennon says it’s important to monitor the drug’s usage because it can cause kidney damage.

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Michael Baron: I’ve had some positive experiences with the drug myself, although the circumstances were quite different. In 2007, I was involved in a collision while playing and I required emergency surgery on my neck to repair the cervical spine. After the surgery, I was administered Toradol every 3 – 4 hours and I had absolutely no pain whatsoever (outside of the injection point). The point is, it is an extremely effective solution even for the greatest levels of pain, and so as long as it’s controlled inside the Mets clubhouse, it can be a very valuable asset, especially for someone like Santana who will undoubtedly face challenges in his road to recovery.

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For more on the use of Toradol and the Mets, check out Newsday.