MetsBlog Q&A: Josh Satin talks at bats, playing OF

Josh Satin 1 polaroidJosh Satin had two hits, including a home run, during Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Braves.

Satin has reached base (hit/walk/HBP) in the last 29 games that he has started, tying a Mets rookie record set by Steve Henderson in 1977.

He is batting .303 on the year, but hitting .382 in 55 at bats against left-handed pitching. Meanwhile, Ike Davis is batting .310 in his 111 at bats against right-handed pitching.

Here is a sample of MetsBlog contributor Robert Brender’s quick one-on-one with Satin, which you can listen to its entirety at the end of this post…


How have you changed your swing over the last few years?

Satin: I’m just simplifying everything. Widening out a little bit and being able to really concentrate on the pitches that are thrown when I’m in the box, as opposed to what I’m doing. I think sometimes guys, especially myself in the past, you’re so worried about making sure you’re in the right position to hit that sometimes you don’t let yourself see the ball and swing at the right pitches. So instead of sometimes thinking your swing is off, you’re really not swinging at the right pitches and not giving yourself an opportunity. So for me it’s just simplifying everything and allowing myself to battle the pitcher as opposed to battling myself up there.

How difficult is to play one day, sit the next, compared to playing every day in the minor leagues?

Satin: It’s definitely different. There’s challenges both ways. Playing every day is a challenge because you’re tired. Everyone sees ten at-bats of you in two days, so they have an idea of what you’re doing. That’s a challenge in itself. But then not playing every day, just staying sharp is really the key. It’s not easy to replicate an at-bat in a game while hitting in the cage, even with as much work as you put in, feeling like you’re locked into the game. Just trying to stay sharp is the biggest key. Just trusting your swing when you’re not in there every day. It’s not easy. Just try to keep the same routine every day and just battle out there.

How do you feel about playing the outfield?

Satin: I would love to be able to play there. I think it’s going to take some work, especially coming into the offseason. That’s going to be a big key for me, being able to play out there and give myself more versatility. To be a part of this team you can’t really be a one-dimensional guy. You can’t just be able to hit and maybe play at first base and occasionally third. Especially since David next year, or later on in the year, will be healthy. There’s not really much opportunity to play there. Getting out there and giving Terry and the coaching staff the ability to play me in different spots will be huge.



Brender is a broadcaster for Long Beach State Men’s Basketball, host of Your 49er Insider and guest contributor to MetsBlog.com and MetsMinorLeagueBlog.com. You can follow him on Twitter here.