Mets could open official contract negotiations with David Wright next week

According to Andy Martino of the Daily News, the Mets could begin official contract negotiations with the agents for David Wright as early as next week.

As for Alderson’s need to convince both Wright and R.A. Dickey the organization is indeed headed in the right direction, Martino writes:

“Alderson has already launched his pitch to Wright and Dickey, in conversations that took place in September. Presenting an honest assessment of the team’s ability to contend next year (in summary: Anything can happen, but it will probably take another year before the Mets can finish .500 or better), the GM has assured the players that he expects greater financial flexibility before the 2014 season, and believes that the organization’s young pitchers will be developed by that time.”

Wright is in the final year Wright of a six-year, $55 million contract he signed during the 2006 season. He has a $16 million club option for 2013 with a $1 million buyout.

In regards to Dickey, Martino says there appears to be more “internal debate” about how to address Dickey’s future, as concerns remain about his age and the injuries he’s sustained over the last two years.

Dickey just completed a two-year, $7.8 million contract he signed with the Mets before the 2011 season. The Mets hold a $5 million option on Dickey for 2013 with a $300,000 buyout, after which he can become a free agent.

Michael Baron, Contributor

Posted Sept. 30: In regards to David Wright, I do believe the two sides will work out a new contract that takes Wright to the end of his career. Like I said earlier, Wright’s value goes beyond what he does on the field – he is a signature player in the history of the New York Mets, a home-grown superstar which is vital to their identity and brand, and is the connection between the team and the fans. Based on what the two sides have consistently said about this issue over time, it sounds as though there is common interest to get a deal done despite Wright’s questions about the franchise. But again, I don’t think the Mets can waive a magic wand and get this done. Actions speak louder than words and the Mets have a lot to prove both to the player and to the game they have the ability and desire to invest in their roster all while becoming a consistent winner.