Dillon Gee 10 (Baron)

Dillon Gee found himself in the Bronx

Dillon Gee started 2013 going 2-6 with a 6.34 ERA in his first 10 starts.

He pitched well against the Yankees to end May and went 10-5 with a 2.71 ERA in his final 22 games.

“I just think it was the culmination of everything that had been going wrong went right that night,” Gee told SNY’s Mets Hot Stove, talking about the game against the Yankees in the Bronx. “It was a turning point, like a light when off in my head and I said, ‘OK, this is how I’m supposed to be pitching.’ I don’t know if it was because of the time off, but it was like those first two months I was searching for the old me and finally I found it.”

Gee ended the year 12-11 with a 3.62 ERA in 32 starts, during which he struck out 142 and walked 47 in 199 innings.

Maggie Wiggin, Contributor

Gee put together the best season of his career. In retrospect, the short, rough outings that characterized his April and May can largely be attributed to his need to rebuild strength following his season-ending shoulder surgery in 2012. Beginning with his 12-strikeout gem against the Yankees, he stayed strong and effective all season. As a contact pitcher, his success will depend more on luck and defense than if he could blow hitters away, so I don’t expect this level of outcome from him on a regular basis, though he is a fourth or fifth starter that any team in baseball would be lucky to have.

Michael Baron, Contributor

The amazing part about his story this past season was that he was seemingly moments away from losing his rotation spot, but he found himself and turned in to one of the better pitchers in all of baseball.  A key difference for Gee was his change-up, which is his bread and butter pitch. It needs to be eye-level for him to be successful. Early in the season, it just wasn’t there and he was relying primarily on a fastball/slider combination with an occasional knuckle-curve to get by. He established his change-up during the Yankees game and never looked back.




29 comments
Benji Isabel
Benji Isabel

He is my favorite Met. I remember seeing him mopping up a Spring Training game and really liking what I saw. So I went to Met sites and saw "Gee is no prospect" over and over. Showing what pundits know.

Izeaac Izenhower
Izeaac Izenhower

Dylan's stock was probably the highest it will be in his career. They should have tried to shop him more to get a SS or a future bat. I mean they keep selling us on the amazing potential of arms that we have in the farm system. Why not grow some stones and bring some up early. The Cardinals were pretty successful with the idea. Oh Wait the Mets are more worried about saving money rather than winning games.

hankypanky
hankypanky

Maybe the headline "Dillon Gee found himself in the Bronx" might change to "Dillon Gee will be in the Bronx" I hope not.

Frank D
Frank D

If all goes well, I will gladly take a rotation that consists of Harvey, Wheeler, Syndergaard, Niese, and Gee.  I will put that up against any other rotation in the league.  

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

"A key difference for Gee was his change-up, which is his bread and butter pitch. It needs to be eye-level for him to be successful."

From high school up to independent ball, every single pitching coach I ever had STRESSED the importance of keeping the change-up down.  Leaving the change-up "eye-level" is legitimately like throwing the guy a beach ball batting practice pitch.

Just further proof that the majority of people writing for this site have no clue how the game of baseball is played.

gloveman
gloveman

I really enjoy reading Maggie's posts, but I don't always agree. First of all I think rythem was more what Dylan needed more so than rebuilding strength. And I also don't see any reason the Dylan can't repeat or continue what he did last year. The thinking pitcher who relies on his knowledge of hitters, and ability to pitch are more consistent and reliable than those who need 97mph. Baron was more on point with his mentioning the change-up. Dylan has one of the best changes I've seen. That will take him far along with his cerebral approach.

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

Some have said this already, but I agree that Gee has a good chance to be dealt - specifically as a deadline deal.  Teams will covet his contract situation and we've all seen the insane prices teams pay for SP help around the deadline, especially now that the extra wildcard has been added.

And even if the Mets are sniffing contention around the deadline, I still think it would be wise to move him if he fetches a worthwhile return.  The younger arms will be ready post all-star break, and let's face it - the Mets aren't going to want to pay Gee arbitration money if he puts together a solid year anyway.

imissshea
imissshea

I once fell asleep on an uptown D train and found myself in the Bronx, too!

mets4lyfe
mets4lyfe

" A key difference for Gee was his change-up, which is his bread and butter pitch. It needs to be eye-level for him to be successful"

what? the main reason that he wasn't successful in April and May was because he was coming back from a blood clot surgery. Furthermore, his fastball was in the 85-88 mph range during those months. The difference between his fastball and changeup just wasn't significant, thus hitters were tee'ing off of him. However, as the months progressed, he started to gain more and more velocity back, which started to make his change-up more effective. It's no surprise that Gee's most effective outings came when his fastball was in the 88-91 mph range in 2013. 

mets2014
mets2014

I like Gee and I think he will be an important part of the rotation this year while most likely making under $4M through arbitration.  The question is what will his value be for the 2015 season?  Assuming this season he has a similar year to last year and that sets him up for a nice pay day going into 2015.  It may be worthwhile to deal him at some point prior to 2015, because he can be replaced by the young arms coming up and in the meantime he may be able to bring something of value back to the mets. 

Anthony Fiore
Anthony Fiore

This is so poorly written......Dillon Gee started 2013 going 4-6 with a 6.34 ERA in his first 10 starts.

He pitched well against the Yankees to end May and went 13-9 with a 2.73 ERA in his final 22 games.


If this were the case his record would be 17-15. 


BUT...


Gee ended the year 13-12 with a 3.62 ERA in 32 starts, during which he struck out 142 and walked 47 in 199 innings.



Krista Marie
Krista Marie

I'm pretty sure it was just shaving the beard.

Mont5
Mont5

Don't know if it was that the light turned on for Gee is what more like hearing rumors of being sent down to the minors that did it.

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

I'd take that rotation too.

However, I'd have no problem with an unproven or question-mark 5th starter if it meant acquiring an impact bat for a package with Gee or Niese in it.

Mitch Petanick
Mitch Petanick

That's the first thing I thought when I read that sentence...leave the changeup up in the zone and it will get hammered.

gloveman
gloveman

@Robby Johnson Good point. He does have a great change, but you're right about it being more effective low. Dropping out of the strike zone. 

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

@mets4lyfe Hahaha amen dude.  

Not only that, no pitcher in his right mind ever wants his change-up to be "eye-level".  Are you kidding me??!!  The only place you ever want to miss with a change-piece is down because even guys that jump out on their front foot can still potentially adjust to the pitch due to its lower velocity.


Go read a book Baron.  My God.

Ravi Kirtane
Ravi Kirtane

@mets2014 I agree - I think he ultimately gets dealt, potentially this summer depending on his performance as well as that of the team. 

Lee Lewin
Lee Lewin

@Anthony Fiore I was just going to start typing this. Mistakes happen especially when things are not checked over and over again. Its a blog that is free for us so holding to super high standards such as this really isn't a big deal IMO. However, it would be nice for the math geeks to check their blog entries before they hit publish. 

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

I wouldn't completely dismiss the shoulder/clot surgery as a cause for his ineffectiveness early in the season.

He did have more than enough time to recover, but I remember reading quotes from Gee about how his arm/shoulder never felt stronger as he began his throwing program this time last year - that he wasn't experiencing early soreness he typically did in the past.

As a former pitcher, feeling "too strong" can take some getting used to.  In a sense, it requires you to tune your mechanics in a different fashion than you've been used to because you had to compensate for the ache or soreness.

Just saying, pitching effectively requires lots of bodily movements to be in sync, so changing an integral facet of the process can be tough on consistency.

Robby Johnson
Robby Johnson

@gloveman The point of a change-up is to appear as a fastball out of the hand and remain on the same plane as a heater.  Some guys get away with a flat change because they can locate, but most guys now days throw changes that dip at the end.

If the plane of Gee's fastball is consistently eye-level, he won't be a Major League pitcher much longer.

bromancer
bromancer

@Lee Lewin @Anthony Fiore

Yeah, since when do stats matter in baseball?