Matt Harvey undergoes successful Tommy John surgery

The Mets announced Matt Harvey underwent successfully Tommy John surgery on his right elbow today.

The surgery was performed by Dr. James Andrews in Gulf Breeze, Florida.

Harvey was diagnosed with a torn ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow in late August. He was originally going to attempt to rehab the injury, but ultimately decided to have the operation.

Harvey is expected to miss the entire 2014 season.


Matt Harvey will have surgery within a week or so

In the next week or so, Matt Harvey will have Tommy John surgery that could force him to most all of 2014.


Oct. 17, 6:50 pm: The team is still coordinating details and the surgery is expected to occur in the next week or so, Harvey’s agent, Scott Boras, told media in Los Angeles (MLB.comNewsday)

Oct. 17, 11:28 am: The Mets are not yet aware when Harvey will undergo surgery (ESPN NY).

Matthew Cerrone, Lead Writer

Oct. 16, 9:00 am: This is a bit odd, but I’d be curious to know if the team’s rehab coordinator and training staff were unaware of Harvey’s plans, too, since it’s most important that they are in the loop. If I had to bet, Rubin’s source is someone in the front office, who may or may not be responsible for knowing Harvey’s every move. Also, it’s typical that the player’s people would book the surgery in the off-season, because of travel. I suppose there is a chance this all went down quickly, and Rubin just happened to ask during the downtime. Or, the Mets are totally ignorant as to what their best player is doing, as some fans and media want to conclude. I don’t know the truth.

In either case, I think it’s far to raise an eyebrow over one front office person not knowing Harvey’s plans. I’d raise both and think, ‘Here we go again,’ only if I learned it was the entire team, GM, training staff and coordinators included, but it doesn’t seem like that is the case…

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Armed with info, Harvey will have TJ surgery in next couple of weeks

Matt Harvey is expected to have Tommy John surgery in the next couple of weeks, his agent Scott Boras told the New York Post’s Kevin Kernan.

Harvey announced his decision last week.

“He had repeated conversations with the doctors, and did a very thorough analysis and I think in the end the doctors agreed that this is something that Matt ought to do,” Boras said. “He looked closely at all the information that was given him and made his decision.”


Read More: New York Post (Kernan)

Matt Harvey will have Tommy John surgery

Matt Harvey has elected to have Tommy John surgery on the partial tear ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow, Sandy Alderson announced late Friday.

The surgery will cause him to miss the entire 2014 season.

Matt Harvey 1 polaroid“This was a more reasoned approach to the injury,” GM Sandy Alderson said, as to why Harvey decided to have surgery instead of proceeding with a throwing program. Alderson said Harvey had begun rehabbing, but not throwing.

Harvey and Alderson met on Friday to confirm the pitcher’s decision.

“I felt this would be the right decision. So, in that sense, I’m happy that Matt has reached that same conclusion,” Alderson said.

As for how this affects the team moving forward, Alderson said nothing has changed.

“This doesn’t change our plan at all,” Alderson said. “But, it does provide some clarity that we didn’t have.”

Alderson later mentioned that the Mets have two rotation spots open, outside of Jon Niese, Zack Wheeler and Dillon Gee. The GM said he would be a “little uncomfortable” filling those holes entirely from within the organization.

“It’s a possibility,” Alderson said, of calling on one of his young pitchers in the minors. “I don’t think it’s a scenario we would prefer.”

When can the Mets expect their All-Star pitcher back? Tommy John surgery usually takes a full calendar year to recover from, which will set Harvey up to return with enough time for spring training heading into the 2015 season. Alderson said the team is targeting a date of February 1, 2015.

“Each surgery is different, each rehab period is different, each individual pitcher is different, so we’ll just have to wait and see,” Alderson said. “I will confirm, though, that when he’s ready to pitch, he will be in the rotation. And, he’ll return to his prior form, which we all know was extraordinary this season.”

Dr. James Andrews will preform the surgery later this month, the team said.

To listen to Alderson’s talk with reporters, click here.

Matthew Cerrone, Lead Writer

Thankfully, the front office and people connected to the team have been talking and planning like Harvey was going to have surgery, so I don’t think this is catching them off guard by any means. What’s more, I actually think this was their preferred way forward. In talking to people aware of their thinking, I never heard anyone say they hoped he gambled on his elbow. I’m sure they would have loved to see him pitch next season, but if he was eventually going to need surgery, I think they prefer him under the knife now, knowing 100 percent he’ll be ready for ALL of 2015.

Last week, I talked with Will Carroll about Harvey’s situation, the ins and outs of Tommy John surgery, how Nolan Ryan and Adam Wainright faced a similar scenario, how organizations try to protect their pitchers overall and the slow adaptation by teams of biomechanics, which you can listen to here:

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Matt Harvey qualifies to pitch in Arizona Fall League

Matt Harvey 1 polaroidAdam Rubin of ESPN New York says Matt Harvey would qualify to pitch in the Arizona Fall League this winter.

According to Rubin, Harvey is eligible because he has pitched less than two years in the big leagues and has missed time due to injury.

Earlier this week, Sandy Alderson said it was possible Harvey could pitch in the Arizona Fall League in an effort to test his injured right elbow.

In late August, Harvey was diagnosed with a partially torn Ulnar Collateral Ligament in his right elbow, and was placed on the 15-day disabled list. He was transferred to the 60-day disabled list earlier this week to make room for Cesar Puello, who was activated from the restricted list.


Read more: ESPN New York

Matt Harvey may see Arizona Fall League starts

Matt Harvey 1 polaroidSandy Alderson said today that he would like to see Matt Harvey eventually pitch in game-like conditions during his rehab the next couple of months.

Alderson suggested possible starts in the Arizona Fall League as part of Harvey’s rehab process.

“The strong desire is that we will finish this process within the six- to eight-week time frame,” Alderson told reporters, according to ESPN New York. “We’re in the six- to eight-week window, but when he actually starts throwing is a little bit unclear.”

Arizona Fall League eligibility rules state that “no players with more than one year of credited Major League service as of August 31 are eligible.” Harvey may not be able to pitch in the AFL due to these eligibility rules, no matter how much Alderson or the Mets may want to see that.

Harvey has not started throwing from flat ground yet, but is believed to be starting his rehab process soon.


In last week’s MetsBlog Q&Acast, pres. by Verizon, Matthew Cerrone talked with injury expert Will Carroll about Harvey’s situation and the ins and outs of Tommy John surgery, which you can listen to here

Recapr, presented by Pepsi: Matt Harvey still believes he’ll be back in 2014

Matt Harvey 2 polaroid“I strongly believe I’ll be back next year,” Matt Harvey said today, talking to MLB Network.

Dr. James Andrews informed Harvey on Tuesday that his elbow is ‘stable,’ however Tommy John surgery is still a possibility for Harvey if the rehab doesn’t work.

Later today, Terry Collins told WFAN that if Harvey believes he can pitch next season, Collins would bet on Harvey every day.

“If he thinks he can do it, I wouldn’t put it past him,” Collins said.

Harvey announced Tuesday that he will try to rehabilitate the torn ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow. In the next few days, he will begin a throwing program that will run for six to eight weeks, after which he will see how his arm handles throwing and determine if surgery is the best course of action, Sandy Alderson later added.

Injury expert Will Carroll has said that if Harvey decides to have surgery, he could wait until December, as opposed to doing it now, and still not lose much time in his rehab.


SNY.tv Recapr takes a look at the reaction to Matt Harvey’s decision to rehab his elbow instead of having immediate surgery.

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In less than two minutes, Recapr, Presented by Pepsi, covers the coverage of New York’s sports stories, pulling together multiple angles and viewpoints – from TV to Twitter to text to talk radio – giving you the whole story in one place.


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Questions and answers surrounding Matt Harvey’s injury

Matt Harvey 1 polaroidWill Carroll has been writing about sports injuries for 12 years, appearing in SI.com and ESPN.com. He now writes for Bleacher Report, where he recently answered every question you probably have about Matt Harvey’s injury and why he’s waiting to decide on surgery…

In Carroll’s opinion…

  • It’s worth it for Harvey to wait, possibly until December, to have the surgery…
  • Harvey was not showing signs of fatigue, according to advanced research on PitchFX…
  • The team did a reasonable job of trying to keep their ace healthy during the season…
  • The Brewers and Orioles are the only teams that spend money to do biomechanical evaluations on all their pitchers…
  • If he is able to avoid surgery, he will be ready for spring training…
  • If he is forced to have Tommy John surgery, he will miss a minimum of 10 months and likely would miss the entire 2014 season…

To read more from Carroll, whose post is titled Everything You Need to Know About Matt Harvey’s Elbow Injury and Recovery, click here.

Matt Harvey will rehab… for now

Matt Harvey will try to rehabilitate the torn ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow.

Harvey will embark on a throwing plan for six to eight weeks, and will see how his arm handles that, Sandy Alderson told reporters.

Matt Harvey 2 polaroid“I’ve never had pain in my actual elbow area, where the UCL is,” Harvey said. “For me, it felt like why jump into surgery in a situation where i never had tingling, numbness, shooting pain in my elbow? If rehab is the way to go… then that’s what I want to do.”

Harvey visited Dr. James Andrews on Monday for a second opinion on his arm.

“Nothing was moving in places it shouldn’t,” Harvey said of Dr. Andrews’ tests.

Alderson wouldn’t comment on the severity of the tear, with a tear of 30 percent or more almost always resulting in Tommy John surgery.

“The doctors have never attached a percentage to the tear,” Alderson said.

Tommy John surgery is still possible for Harvey if the rehab doesn’t work.

Previously, Will Carroll said that if Harvey does require surgery, he could wait until December. If he waits until then, the timeline wouldn’t be that much different if he had the surgery now, in relation to preparing for the 2015 season.

“No one should be surprised that Matt Harvey has chosen not to have Tommy John surgery. He’ll continue to rehab it and see where it goes. Got to take the shot to avoid surgery when you can,” Carroll said in a video post to Instagram.

“It won’t effect our plans as much as suggested,” Alderson said. “We have depth at starting pitching. I don’t see us working hard if he can’t come back.”

“Last three weeks have been tough,” Harvey said. “I want to be pitching. Not knowing it a tough process. Everything feels normal. I know there are some symptoms of forearm tightness, but I’ve never had elbow pain or sharp pain. We’ll see how it goes from there.”

Harvey will start his throwing program off flat ground in the next few days.

“One thing you shouldn’t expect…” Alderson warned. “Rigid deadlines.”


Sandy Alderson and Matt Harvey talk about the decision for Harvey to rehab his elbow for the next 6-8 weeks instead of getting surgery.

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Harvey to see doctor soon, lots of decisions to be made

Matt Harvey 1 polaroid

Matt Harvey will go back to the doctor in three weeks, at which point the swelling in his elbow will have subsided and doctors can better determine the extent of the ligament tear in his elbow, Terry Collins told MLB Network Radio last Friday.

In the end, the decision to have surgery or not will be determined by the doctors, Sandy Alderson, Harvey and his agent, Scott Boras.

“This is definitely something to keep your eye on,” a front office executive recently told the Daily News. “It might be in his best interest to just have the surgery now, and move on with his career, but if the player doesn’t want to do it, you never know. And you know (agent) Scott (Boras) is going to have a big say in this. There are a lot of moving parts here.”

Matthew Cerrone, Lead Writer

In some ways, Harvey’s follow-up visit is this team’s biggest game of the year. The happenings on field seem secondary, at this point.

The way I understand, there is a certain percentage of a tear that will require surgery if he ever wants to pitch again. If it’s a small tear, doctors may recommend surgery, but it will not be required. If it’s an even smaller tear, Harvey can work hard with rehab and likely be ready for Opening Day next season, and maybe even strengthen himself — like Roy Halladay did — to avoid elbow surgery entirely… for now.

If it’s the worst case scenario, the choice is obvious: surgery. However, if it’s the middle range, where surgery is recommended, but not required — like Adam Wainwright — the most difficult decision will need to be made: to have surgery, miss a year and come back later, or pitch now, punt on surgery and hope for the best.

What’s more, what does this mean for his next contract? What does it mean for Alderson’s off-season plan? There are a lot of moving parts and things to be considered.

Read More: Daily News (Martino)

Roy Halladay spoke to Matt Harvey about his elbow injury

At the request of Terry Collins, Roy Halladay talked with Matt Harvey for 20 minutes about his elbow injury, the manager told reporters Wednesday.

Roy Halladay“I really appreciated it,” Collins said about Halladay, according to the New York Times. “A guy like him, just the fact that he’s going to talk to an opponent and give the time to a guy he doesn’t know, speaks a lot about the character of Roy Halladay. And you know what, when you’re Matt Harvey, that’s the guy you want him to be.”

Halladay was shut down September 2006 with pain in his throwing elbow. Similar to Harvey, Halladay had to wait for the swelling to go down in his elbow before doctors could recommend a course of action.  Ultimately, despite the initial fear, doctors found no serious tear in Halladay’s elbow. Instead of having surgery, Halladay rehabilitated his elbow and started the next year’s spring training.

In an interview Wednesday with ESPN 98.7 FM, Sandy Alderson said that, while there is always the possibility surgery could be avoided, he doesn’t want Harvey getting his hopes up.

“Typically, in these situations where denial is part of one’s reaction, the passage of time usually helps with that,” Alderson said.

By the way, according to Halladay, if he were to start a franchise, Harvey is the guy he would want, he told Newsday.

Matthew Cerrone, Lead Writer

It’s all about that next visit between Harvey and his doctor, at which point they’ll determine how bad the tear is in his elbow.

The way I understand, there is a certain percentage of a tear that will require surgery if he ever wants to pitch again. If it’s a small enough tear, doctors may recommend surgery, but it will not be required. If it’s an even smaller tear, Harvey can go nuts with rehab, therapies and likely be ready for Opening Day, and maybe even strengthen himself — like Halladay — to avoid elbow surgery entirely.

If it’s the worst case scenario, the choice is obvious: surgery. However, if it’s the middle range, where surgery is recommended, but not required — like Adam Wainwright — the real, difficult decision will need to be made: to have surgery, miss a year and come back later, or pitch now, punt on surgery and hope for the best.

The buzz from Citi Field seems to be that — given the timeline and how the tear evolved — no one expects to learn of a devastating tear. It’s likely to be one of the “better” two options, but no one will know until Harvey’s next doctor visit, which will likely be a couple of weeks from now.

Read More: Newsday, ESPN New York, New York Times, CBS Sports,